Types of Pediatric Dental Emergencies

kids-dental-emergency

Any health emergency should be taken seriously, and dental emergencies are no exception. But what is considered a dental emergency and what should be done in the event of one?

 

Any dental problem that puts the future of a tooth in jeopardy, causes ongoing tissue bleeding, or severe pain is considered to be a dental emergency and should be immediately addressed. 

 

If your child is experiencing a dental emergency, call Wilson Pediatric Dentistry immediately at (252) 291-4300. 

 

Below are some common types of dental emergencies and the appropriate actions for each. 

Common Types of Dental Emergencies

Knocked out tooth

Every year, more than five million teeth are knocked out in children and adults. Sports and general roughhousing are the most common culprits. 

 

What to do:

 

  1. Pick up the tooth by the crown (the top). Do not touch the root.
  2. Rinse off the tooth, but don’t scrub it or remove any attached tissue. 
  3. Try to place the tooth back into the socket and hold it in place until you get to the dentist. If you are unable to do so, place it in a cup of milk. 
  4. Call your dentist immediately. If you’re near Wilson, North Carolina, call Wilson Pediatric Dentistry. Time is of the essence for a knocked out tooth. 

Chipped or fractured tooth

A tooth that becomes cracked or chipped on the outside has often suffered some internal damage as well that can put the tooth’s health in danger. 

 

What to do:

 

  1. Rinse out your mouth with warm water. 
  2. Use a cold compress to minimize any swelling if facial trauma was involved. 
  3. You may take acetaminophen to alleviate pain. 
  4. Make an appointment with your dentist as soon as possible. 

Injuries to the mouth

Punctures, tears, and cuts to the lips, cheeks, gums, mouth, or tongue can constitute a dental emergency when severe.

 

What to do: 

 

  1. Clean the affected area with warm water.
  2. Apply pressure to the wound with gauze. 
  3. Take acetaminophen for pain.
  4. Get to an oral surgeon or emergency room as soon as possible.

Oral infection

Most infections of the mouth are not considered to be emergencies. But if you experience swelling around the jawline or under your mouth and have difficulty breathing or swallowing, it may qualify as a dental emergency. 

 

What to do:

 

  1. Take acetaminophen for pain and swelling.
  2. Contact your dentist. 

Contact Wilson Pediatric Dentistry

If your child is experiencing a dental emergency, call us right away to schedule a same-day appointment today. Dental emergencies can lead to long-term damage if they’re not addressed right away, and the team at Wilson Pediatric Dentistry is standing by to help.  

 

    

Ask Your Nearby Dentist: Is Mouthwash Safe for My Child?

child brushing her teeth to prepare for a dentist appointment near her

Although proper dental care is just as necessary for kids as it is for adults, your child’s routine won’t be exactly the same as yours. Children start with kid-safe toothpaste, brushes, floss, and eventually graduate to the adult versions. For this reason, you may have wondered about mouthwash. Is it safe for your child? When should they start using mouthwash? Fortunately, your nearby dentist is here with some answers.

Should Your Child Be Using Mouthwash? Your Nearby Dentist Explains

Mouthwash does more than just freshen your breath. Certain brands also wash away loose plaque and strengthen your teeth with fluoride. However, it isn’t right for every child.

Is Mouthwash Safe for My Child?

This largely depends on their age. Although fluoride mouthwash can be incredibly helpful in helping your child right cavities, the American Dental Association (ADA) recommends waiting until they are about six years old to introduce it to their routine. This is because these younger kids may have a harder time not swallowing the mouthwash. Fluoride is perfectly safe in small amounts (it is found in most municipal water supplies,) but consuming too much of it at an early age can result in fluorosis or discoloration of the enamel.

Don’t worry about your child getting enough fluoride before they can use mouthwash. Fluoride treatment is a major part of general exams and cleaning when you take them to your nearby dentist.

Look For Kid-Friendly Mouthwash

Like most other dental care tools, there are plenty of child-friendly varieties of mouthwash you can choose from. These usually feature popular cartoon characters or superheroes and come in sweet flavors like bubblegum or berry.

The differences are more than just superficial. Mouthwashes that are geared towards kids omit potentially harmful ingredients found in the adult versions, like alcohol. Alcohol is useful for killing bacteria for adults but can hinder healthy growth and development for children.

Supervision and Safety

The best way to make sure your child is safely using mouthwash is to supervise them for the first few months. Demonstrate to them how to rinse and spit the first few times. Tell them that even though it tastes good, they shouldn’t drink it. Watch them closely to make sure they don’t swallow and let them know when they’ve done a good job.

When your child isn’t using it, the mouthwash should be kept out of reach. Why? With its bright colors and sweet flavors, it may remind them of their favorite sugary drink. This means they may be tempted to try to drink it when you aren’t looking, and even the safest mouthwash shouldn’t be swallowed.

Want More Info? Ask a Pediatric Dentist Near You?

Still unsure of whether your child is ready for mouthwash? You can always check with a pediatric dentist near you. Dr. Elmore of Wilson Pediatric Dentistry has years of experience helping tiny teeth shine and grow, and she is happy to help you create a dental plan for your child. Schedule your appointment or contact us at (252)-291-4300 to learn more.